vicemag:

Is America Finally Ready to Abandon the Electoral College and Embrace the Popular Vote
US presidential elections are frequently the butt of jokes worldwide, and deservedly so. Between the eye-popping fundraising totals, the awkward pandering to billionaires, and the shameless jockeying for the support of key interest groups in weird places like Iowa and New Hampshire, there’s a lot to hate.
Much of this can be blamed on the electoral college. Instead of simply counting votes nationwide and giving the Oval Office to the guy or gal with the most ballots, America holds 50 statewide elections, then awards points called “electors” to the winner of each election. It’s a confusing system that makes winning 51 percent of the votes in California more than ten times as valuable as winning 100 percent of the votes in Nebraska, and gives special status to the few swing states that could go either way. Standard practice nowadays is for candidates to camp out in the dozen or so of these key states, which enjoy special status because their cities are surrounded by dense, conservative suburbs that balance out the votes of liberal urbanites. This means millions of voters are effectively stuck on the margins of political life, and thanks to our system we risk disaster every four years.
George W. Bush’s incredible non-victory in 2000—which came, of course, thanks to an assist from his dad’s pals on the Supreme Court—may be the the most recent example, but it doesn’t even scratch the surface of the twisted intrigue that the electoral college has encouraged over the years. After the 1876 election saw the electors go one way and the popular vote the other, the “compromise” that was reached set the stage for a flood of Jim Crow laws and racial terrorism into the American South, as a key concession from the Republicans was to remove occupying federal troops that had been in the former Confederate states since the Civil War.
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vicemag:

Is America Finally Ready to Abandon the Electoral College and Embrace the Popular Vote

US presidential elections are frequently the butt of jokes worldwide, and deservedly so. Between the eye-popping fundraising totals, the awkward pandering to billionaires, and the shameless jockeying for the support of key interest groups in weird places like Iowa and New Hampshire, there’s a lot to hate.

Much of this can be blamed on the electoral college. Instead of simply counting votes nationwide and giving the Oval Office to the guy or gal with the most ballots, America holds 50 statewide elections, then awards points called “electors” to the winner of each election. It’s a confusing system that makes winning 51 percent of the votes in California more than ten times as valuable as winning 100 percent of the votes in Nebraska, and gives special status to the few swing states that could go either way. Standard practice nowadays is for candidates to camp out in the dozen or so of these key states, which enjoy special status because their cities are surrounded by dense, conservative suburbs that balance out the votes of liberal urbanites. This means millions of voters are effectively stuck on the margins of political life, and thanks to our system we risk disaster every four years.

George W. Bush’s incredible non-victory in 2000—which came, of course, thanks to an assist from his dad’s pals on the Supreme Court—may be the the most recent example, but it doesn’t even scratch the surface of the twisted intrigue that the electoral college has encouraged over the years. After the 1876 election saw the electors go one way and the popular vote the other, the “compromise” that was reached set the stage for a flood of Jim Crow laws and racial terrorism into the American South, as a key concession from the Republicans was to remove occupying federal troops that had been in the former Confederate states since the Civil War.

Continue

looking for ‘photo editor’ for hobart

fast-machine:

email me ee at hobartpulp dot com if you are a ‘photographer’ and are interested in the (nonpay) job/seeing yr photos on hobart

(include 2 or 3 photographs with yr email. thx.)

(via hobartpulp)

Andrew  Worthington - happy hour

So here is the second track from my lost tracks that I discussed last week

I don’t remember who I recorded these with, but I am getting a clearer idea

I hope to be able to tell you who they actually were soon

I am singing and playing guitar and/or bass 

I do now have dates for when these were recorded

The dates were from April 30 to May 10 2007

This is one of the better recordings (better than the recording I released last week)

I am pretty sure I had never been to a happy hour in my life at this point in my life, so I don’t know why I called it that

Maybe I saw a sign outside a bar

Or maybe it was from one of those food-based “happy hours”

Those exist, right?

Lemme know what you think

Sort of proud of this one

46 plays
deejberndt:

this is my favorite poem from SCARECRONE. I’ve read it every day for the past two weeks.

deejberndt:

this is my favorite poem from SCARECRONE. I’ve read it every day for the past two weeks.

(via blog-illuminatigirlgang)

Andrew  Worthington - arcadia

so my friend (and ex-bandmate) bob sent me some tracks that I had sent him on AIM or iChat in like 2007 or 2008.

i had forgotten about all but one or two of the songs.

my computer that they were on broke a couple years ago, and even before that i had deleted them to make room for probably some complete discography by some band i never listened to

this is the first in ABC order, and it’s pretty weird (humblebrag?)

it is called “arcadia”

i know i am singing and playing bass. i dont know who is playing drums

you can hear me being mean and yelling at someone about an amp or something

i have been feeling nostalgic for music lately 

but i plan to probably not to start playing again

i will try to have more anecdotal/interesting info the next time i post one of these

this is just to get you started?

30 plays
beachsloth:

HOT DOGS! By Andrew Duncan Worthington
                Homes are full of heart. Cities hold millions of homes. People pay rent for the homes dependent on location, desirability, and need. Andrew Duncan Worthington lives in one of those apartments that people tend to look at and wonder “Why do people live in New York?” Rats of varying sizes hang out outside of his apartment. Unlike Andrew Duncan Worthington who has to pay rent and worry about overdrafts, the rats live rent-free. Benefits of being a rat in New York City include strength in numbers, free food, and the power to terrify others. With enough time spent in the city the rats get less terrifying and more annoying. 
                Andrew Duncan Worthington describes a perfectly normal range of emotions for a New Yorker. Yes it is aggravating to deal with idiots on the subway. They always sway to and fro refusing to find a proper standing spot. Everything is overly expensive in New York City. Metrocards end their lives with weird amounts left on them. Poor Andrew Duncan Worthington experiences this firsthand with that $1.40 amount which doesn’t help him at all. Rather he finds himself frustrated at a world designed to price people out. Hence cigarettes are incredibly expensive and everything is for sale. Cheap food becomes an art form in New York City. Plenty of things surround a person in New York City showing off how unaffordable they really are. Millions flock to see New York City hope to thrive there because they don’t know any better. 
                Geography is important throughout New York City. Five boroughs make up New York City and each one has its constraints. Hardly anybody survives the brutality of Manhattan. On the other hand there is Brooklyn ready to take up the artistic cause. Within Manhattan there are cheaper locations kept further away from the teeming populace. Silence in New York City is virtually impossible. The Internet makes it harder. By unplugging everything and simply sitting that is the closest anybody gets to real sublime nature. Even Central Park in its splendor and glory shows off the skyline jutting above the trees. New York City wants to dominate everything even its own parks. 
                Life gets together gradually. Usually people get to their end points before they re-evaluate their lives. Bad habits feel great. People try to break out of them for their health. Economically it is far easier to quit something than it is health-wise. To be healthy typically costs money. Andrew Duncan Worthington understands his life is going great because he knew how badly it was going before. Hindsight is always 20/20, and it splits the 20 with great ease.

beachsloth:

HOT DOGS! By Andrew Duncan Worthington

                Homes are full of heart. Cities hold millions of homes. People pay rent for the homes dependent on location, desirability, and need. Andrew Duncan Worthington lives in one of those apartments that people tend to look at and wonder “Why do people live in New York?” Rats of varying sizes hang out outside of his apartment. Unlike Andrew Duncan Worthington who has to pay rent and worry about overdrafts, the rats live rent-free. Benefits of being a rat in New York City include strength in numbers, free food, and the power to terrify others. With enough time spent in the city the rats get less terrifying and more annoying. 

                Andrew Duncan Worthington describes a perfectly normal range of emotions for a New Yorker. Yes it is aggravating to deal with idiots on the subway. They always sway to and fro refusing to find a proper standing spot. Everything is overly expensive in New York City. Metrocards end their lives with weird amounts left on them. Poor Andrew Duncan Worthington experiences this firsthand with that $1.40 amount which doesn’t help him at all. Rather he finds himself frustrated at a world designed to price people out. Hence cigarettes are incredibly expensive and everything is for sale. Cheap food becomes an art form in New York City. Plenty of things surround a person in New York City showing off how unaffordable they really are. Millions flock to see New York City hope to thrive there because they don’t know any better. 

                Geography is important throughout New York City. Five boroughs make up New York City and each one has its constraints. Hardly anybody survives the brutality of Manhattan. On the other hand there is Brooklyn ready to take up the artistic cause. Within Manhattan there are cheaper locations kept further away from the teeming populace. Silence in New York City is virtually impossible. The Internet makes it harder. By unplugging everything and simply sitting that is the closest anybody gets to real sublime nature. Even Central Park in its splendor and glory shows off the skyline jutting above the trees. New York City wants to dominate everything even its own parks. 

                Life gets together gradually. Usually people get to their end points before they re-evaluate their lives. Bad habits feel great. People try to break out of them for their health. Economically it is far easier to quit something than it is health-wise. To be healthy typically costs money. Andrew Duncan Worthington understands his life is going great because he knew how badly it was going before. Hindsight is always 20/20, and it splits the 20 with great ease.

(via keepthisbagawayfromchildren)

altlitgossip:

excerpt from ‘HOT DOGS!’ by Andrew Duncan Worthington
http://naplitmag.com/echapbooks/hotdogs.pdf

altlitgossip:

excerpt from ‘HOT DOGS!’ by Andrew Duncan Worthington

http://naplitmag.com/echapbooks/hotdogs.pdf

HOT DOGS!

napmag:

image

HOT DOGS! by Andrew Duncan Worthington

PDF Download

My ‘greatest hits’ ebook has arrived!

I wrote a short blog entry about it here.